White House Seeks to Stop Visa Overstays

White House stops visa overstays

The White House issued a memorandum, on April 22, 2019, which seeks to stop visa overstays, particularly in the B-1 business visitor and B-2 tourist visa categories. In this article, our New York immigration lawyer summarizes the main points of this recent White House visa overstay memorandum.   

The White House visa overstay memo specifically focuses on foreign nationals who lawfully entered the US, either on a US visa or through a Visa Waiver Program such as ESTA, and overstayed their authorized period of admission.

The President has asked the US Secretary of State to engage with government authorities of countries with visa overstay rates above 10% to identify conditions that lead to these high overstay rates. The President has also directed the US Attorney General, Secretary of State, Secretary of Homeland Security to develop a plan within 180 days to stop B-1 business visitor and B-2 tourist visa overstays from countries with visa overstays rates above 10%. The plan is expected to include significant restrictions or suspensions of visa issuance for individuals from high overstay rate countries.

The White House has directed the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State, which is responsible for issuing US visas at consular posts worldwide, to “immediately take appropriate actions” to decrease US visa overstay rates for all classes of temporary nonimmigrant visas.

If you are worried about how this White House memo may impact your immigration case, I recommend you contact an experienced immigration lawyer. As part of our immigration attorney New York services, we regularly represent B-1 business visitor and B-2 tourist visa applicants. If you are searching for an “immigration attorney near me” because you wish to apply for a B-1 or B-2 visa, please contact our New York immigration law firm office.  

Who is affected by the White House visa overstay memo?

Nationals of countries that have visa overstay rates of 10% or more can expect difficulties in obtaining B-1 business visitor and B-2 tourist visas. The US Department of Homeland Security Fiscal Year 2018 Entry/Exit Overstay Report identifies the following countries as having overstay rates above 10% in the B-1 business visitor or B-2 tourist visa categories:

  • Afghanistan
  • Angola
  • Bhutan
  • Burundi
  • Cabo Verde
  • Chad
  • Congo (Brazzaville)
  • Djibouti
  • Eritrea
  • Georgia
  • Liberia
  • Mauritania
  • Nigeria
  • Palau
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Syria
  • Yemen

If you are a national of one of the above listed countries and wish to obtain a B-1 or B-2 visitor visa, I recommend you speak with an experienced immigration lawyer. As part of our immigration attorney New York services, we always evaluate the implications of the latest news and developments for our clients’ immigration cases. If you are searching for an “immigration attorney near me” because you wish to apply for B-1 business visitor visa or a B-2 tourist visa, please contact our New York immigration law firm office.  

I offer confidential 30 minute & 1 hour consultations.

Our New York immigration lawyer is here to help you with your immigration case

Are you wondering how the White House visa overstay memo may impact your immigration case? Do you wish to apply for a B-1 or B-2 visitor visa? Are you searching for an “immigration lawyer near me”? As an experienced New York immigration law firm, Pandev Law has the knowledge and experience to guide you through your immigration case.

To learn more about our immigration lawyer New York services or to schedule a consultation with our New York immigration attorney, please complete our contact form, email admin@pandevlaw.com, or call us at (212) 220-6652.

During your consultation, our NYC immigration lawyer will provide an honest assessment of your case, and a recommendation about your next steps.

Disclaimer: This blog article is provided by Pandev Law, LLC for general educational and informational purposes only. Although this article discusses general legal issues, it does not constitute legal advice nor does it establish an attorney-client relationship. No reader should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information presented in this article, or elsewhere on this website, without seeking the advice of appropriate legal counsel, or other professional counsel, licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. Pandev Law, LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability with respect to any actions taken, or not taken, based on any content of this article or website. This blog article may constitute attorney advertising. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.